Emotional Trauma and Spiritual Recover - reading from a new book



We suffer because we are deny ourselves love. Our bodies suffer when we deny them love. And other people suffer when we tempt them to judge or resent us, thereby cutting themselves off from love.


Love is from God. When we walk in His Light and find a bond with Him within through a change of heart, we then experience His love—first His correction, then His forgiveness, followed by His protection. When we experience His forgiveness, we can forgive others. 


We must then also be honest with people. When you are not truthful with others, you are denying them love.


Why do we deny people love? Here are some of the reasons.


We do not understand that love must include truth. So we soften our words, hold our tongue, and try to never make anyone uncomfortable or feel bad. Thereby we allow them to continue in error.


We do not have faith in the power of Truth, and so we want people to be comfortable and experience a little happiness, without discomforting honesty.


Pain is the number one way to make people comply. That is why cruelty, deprivation, and punishment are rampant in this world. Pain is the way that the world gets obedience. It works in several ways. One way is because cruelty tempts the victim to become resentful. And when we are resentful, we thereby fall from love and all that is truly human. 


This causes a terrible psychic pain. This change for the worse, when the soul senses itself falling and failing, is so painful that it makes the soul cry out for relief.


Chances are it will cry out for love from the very one that degraded it. Later in life, the pain associated with the traumatic fall makes the person want to do anything to make the pain go away.


 Thereafter, whenever the victim remembers the cruelty that first degraded him, the pain makes him want to conform to anyone stronger in order ease the pain. Unfortunately, the pain can also make him want to lash out in violence and rage against whoever is weaker and happens to innocently bring the painful memory to mind.


Change is painful, even change for the better. The renowned waterfront philosopher Eric Hoffer aptly titled one of his books The Ordeal of Change. There is a dying or disintegration of a former way of doing things or of a former identity, and there is a taking on of a new way with which one is uncomfortable and unfamiliar.


Most change is for the worse. In the moment when we are treated cruelly (which can take a thousand forms, and usually first occurs in the family), and we respond with resentment—we die a little as the innocent human being we were and we take on a new way, the way of the cruel beast. 


The cruelty can also make us doubt what is good and true. This doubt also makes for our changing for the worse, as we become a part of the world which made us doubt, and we give up the ideals and innocent pursuits of youth to become shallow and ambitious, just like the ones who tempted us. 


The suffering makes us cling to the new dominant ones for reassurance for the altered thing we are becoming, and for comfort to assuage the pain.


Every time you react with resentment or judgment to some cruelty, a change for the worse occurs in you. A little bit of you dies, and it is replaced by a piece of the new order—the one behind the cruelty.


Free Self Help Ebook for Uset

Hi, this is Roland.

I love Mike and I love his story. I co wrote this self help book with Mike and now I have a special offer.

For a donation of any amount, I will send you a pdf of Mike's Story attached to an email as a token of my appreciation.

But first, listen to what Mike as to say:


Here is an letter written by someone who gets it. Mike overcame anxiety, depression and bipolar disorder. In this letter, he comments on the verse from the Psalms and then tells of his recovery journey. Mike gave me permission to share his letter but asked that I only use his first name, Michael. I hope someone will be inspired to give our  meditation a try. All I can say is "Thanks, Mike." Roland

"Hello, my name is Michael. This is my story.

I love this verse from the Psalms.

"He is not afraid of bad news; his heart is firm, trusting in the Lord."

It sounds good, doesn't it? But the question is: how do you get to where you have such a "firm heart and settled spirit?"

It took me a long time to get to where I could understand and say something about having a firm heart and settled spirit. I was Mr. Jellyfish.

But here’s the good news: if I can do it, anyone can do it. It took me 40 years, but that was because it took 40 years for me to get to the point where I was ready. Once you’re ready, recovery can begin in a heartbeat.

And it doesn’t have to take 40 years to be ready. You can be ready in this instant regardless of your age, if your heart is pure and you are sincere.

Here's my story. Let's begin with a few thoughts about anxiety and some observations about life and how I started to recover.  .  .  .  .


But as time went by (as years went by) I learned to fail less. And I also learned to react badly less to my failings. In other words, I began to grow up, and I'm still growing up.

When I was 10, 15, 20, 30 years old, did I have anxiety? Of course. Did I get depressed? Of course.

When my parents got divorced, it bothered me. When my dad died, it made me sad. When my parakeet died, I felt bad. What was I supposed to do, be happy about these things? I grieved and felt hurt and then I got over it.

When I was a little kid, did I go through a spell where I had to do a ritual of counting numbers or arrange my shoes perfectly at night or else "something really bad would happen?" Of course. Then I grew out of it.

When I was in college, was I high and hyper when something good happened and stayed up till dawn talking to my friends? Then did I crash when a bunch of things went wrong? Naturally.

When I was in my 20's did I wonder who I was and if there was a future for me? Did I mess up, and make mistakes? Sure.

And then did something try to tell me I was "worthless" and that "the world would be better off without me?" Of course.

When I was 30 and sitting in a lonely apartment in the outskirts of Chicago, with the snow coming down and nowhere to go and wishing I were back in California, did I feel depressed? Of course.

But here I am. I got through.

My recovery was two part. First it was just growing out of issues. It seems like each stage of our life--little kid, big kid, teenager, college age, 20's, 30's--there are some typical issues to deal with. The old expression "time heals all wounds" definitely applies. Somehow I just grew out of things.


This brings me to part two of my recovery program. I told you about part one, where I got through the various typical issues I faced at different stages. But then came the life changing, game changing discovery. I took me four decades to get to the point where I was ready. But when I was finally ready, it happened in a heartbeat and within a few days I was a new person.

Michael



You will hear him talk about how Zorro and Colombo helped him get through.

You’ll find out what the Zen Master said.

You’ll read about Mike’s close call with Dr. Rough Handling.

Mike loves to philosophize about life, love,

and he likes Frank Sinatra too.

For each stage of his life he reveals how he moved on and left the issues behind.

Mike saves the best for last:

How he found his
spiritual roots with the help of meditation,
a change of heart,
and a hug and a kick in the pants from God.




Preview at Amazon.com

Don't forget my special offer!

 I love Mike and I love his story. I co wrote this book with Mike and now I have a special offer.  

Mike's Story - “How I overcame depression, bipolar, OCD, anxiety and other issues without drugs.” by For a donation of any amount I will send you Mike's Story as an eBook as a token of my appreciation. 


Just click here, make a small donation using Paypal,  and I will send you the eBook right away as an attachment to an email.




 

Self Help Books on Depression

I love Mike and I love his story. I co wrote this self help book with Mike and now I have a special offer.

But first, listen to what Mike as to say:


Here is an letter written by someone who gets it. Mike overcame anxiety, depression and bipolar disorder. In this letter, he comments on the verse from the Psalms and then tells of his recovery journey. Mike gave me permission to share his letter but asked that I only use his first name, Michael. I hope someone will be inspired to give our  meditation a try. All I can say is "Thanks, Mike." Roland

"Hello, my name is Michael. This is my story.

I love this verse from the Psalms.

"He is not afraid of bad news; his heart is firm, trusting in the Lord."

It sounds good, doesn't it? But the question is: how do you get to where you have such a "firm heart and settled spirit?"

It took me a long time to get to where I could understand and say something about having a firm heart and settled spirit. I was Mr. Jellyfish.

But here’s the good news: if I can do it, anyone can do it. It took me 40 years, but that was because it took 40 years for me to get to the point where I was ready. Once you’re ready, recovery can begin in a heartbeat.

And it doesn’t have to take 40 years to be ready. You can be ready in this instant regardless of your age, if your heart is pure and you are sincere.

Here's my story. Let's begin with a few thoughts about anxiety and some observations about life and how I started to recover.  .  .  .  .


But as time went by (as years went by) I learned to fail less. And I also learned to react badly less to my failings. In other words, I began to grow up, and I'm still growing up.

When I was 10, 15, 20, 30 years old, did I have anxiety? Of course. Did I get depressed? Of course.

When my parents got divorced, it bothered me. When my dad died, it made me sad. When my parakeet died, I felt bad. What was I supposed to do, be happy about these things? I grieved and felt hurt and then I got over it.

When I was a little kid, did I go through a spell where I had to do a ritual of counting numbers or arrange my shoes perfectly at night or else "something really bad would happen?" Of course. Then I grew out of it.

When I was in college, was I high and hyper when something good happened and stayed up till dawn talking to my friends? Then did I crash when a bunch of things went wrong? Naturally.

When I was in my 20's did I wonder who I was and if there was a future for me? Did I mess up, and make mistakes? Sure.

And then did something try to tell me I was "worthless" and that "the world would be better off without me?" Of course.

When I was 30 and sitting in a lonely apartment in the outskirts of Chicago, with the snow coming down and nowhere to go and wishing I were back in California, did I feel depressed? Of course.

But here I am. I got through.

My recovery was two part. First it was just growing out of issues. It seems like each stage of our life--little kid, big kid, teenager, college age, 20's, 30's--there are some typical issues to deal with. The old expression "time heals all wounds" definitely applies. Somehow I just grew out of things.


This brings me to part two of my recovery program. I told you about part one, where I got through the various typical issues I faced at different stages. But then came the life changing, game changing discovery. I took me four decades to get to the point where I was ready. But when I was finally ready, it happened in a heartbeat and within a few days I was a new person.

I'll tell you about it in Part Two

Michael


.
Mike's Story “How I overcame depression,
bipolar, OCD, anxiety and other
issues without drugs”


Mike's Story is in Kindle. Preview the eBook. Read the whole inspiring story

Now in quality paperback at Amazon.com look inside!

Mike’s Story “How I overcame depression, bipolar, OCD, anxiety and other issues without drugs.” is the powerful personal testimony of someone who overcame mental health and other issues and went on to enjoy a successful, productive life.

Mike tells you about his childhood:

the traumas,
the obsessions
and compulsions,
his shyness and bipolar.
Mike tells you about his twenties: the
depression, the doubts and the fears.

You will hear him talk about how Zorro and Colombo helped him get through.

You’ll find out what the Zen Master said.

You’ll read about Mike’s close call with Dr. Rough Handling.

Mike loves to philosophize about life, love,

and he likes Frank Sinatra too.

For each stage of his life he reveals how he moved on and left the issues behind.

Mike saves the best for last:

How he found his
spiritual roots with the help of meditation,
a change of heart,
and a hug and a kick in the pants from God.


Preview at Amazon.com now


Dr. Roland Trujillo
  is the author of 16 books. His popular self
help radio program has aired on radio stations around the country for 25
years. He is the author and co author of several self help books on depressions, anxiety, and food issues.

“I love helping people improve their
relationships, overcome personal issues and find
their spiritual roots. People get stuck, and they need
someone who thinks outside the box to help
them look at life with fresh eyes.

People are resilient and can make progress in a very short amount of time.
Sometimes all it takes is an insight or two,
a little meditation to get centered, and knowing that there is someone
who has love, and who both understands
and can help. That’s all.


Preview at Amazon.com

Don't forget my special offer!

 I love Mike and I love his story. I co wrote this book with Mike and now I have a special offer.  

For a donation of any amount I will send you Mike's Story as an eBook as a token of my appreciation. 

Just click here, make a small donation using Paypal,  and I will send you the eBook right away as an attachment to an email.